Section 1, "The Importance of Dreams."

An experimental group. We will read a specific publication of Jung's and discuss it as we read.

Section 1, "The Importance of Dreams."

Postby John Ferric » Mon Jan 23, 2012 10:55 am

A sign is not a symbol, and a symbol is not a sign. Jung wants to emphasize that we humans "unconsciously and spontaneously" produce symbols in our dreams. Thus Jung begins to describe how the human mind works. Our perceptions of reality(the outer world of nature) is conditioned and, to use a term that Jung uses, "translated" into the realm of our mind. Much of this process is carried out unconsciously. When needed the unconscious presents information to us in the form of symbols.
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Re: Section 1, "The Importance of Dreams."

Postby John Ferric » Fri Feb 03, 2012 9:55 am

Understanding how the human mind works is what Jung
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Re: Section 1, "The Importance of Dreams."

Postby John Ferric » Thu Feb 09, 2012 8:37 am

As Jung points out we are co-creators of the world. Our sensory inputs(sight, hearing, smell, touch, etc.) are, to use Jung's term "translated" from outer reality into an inner reality of the mind.
There are, moreover, unconscious aspects of our perception of reality. The first is the fact that even when our senses react to real phenomena, sights, and sounds, they are somehow translated from the realm of reality into that of the mind. Within the mind they become psychic events, whose ultimate nature is unknowable (for the psyche cannot know its own psychical substance). Thus every experience contains an indefinite number of unknown factors, not to speak of the fact that every concrete object is always unknown in certain respects, because we cannot know the ultimate nature of matter itself.
C. G. Jung, Approaching the Unconscious, Part 1, The Importance of Dreams


We are forced by our very human nature to deal with two realities. Take, for example, "unicorns." Do unicorns really exist? In one reality they do, in the other they don't. If I "Google" the term unicorn 85,400,000 results are produced. But despite that impressive number not one iota of evidence exists of the presence of unicorns in that other, the outer, reality. Unicorns are the product of the human mind only. It is the task of, not just consciousness in general, but discriminating consciousness in particular to resolve the conflict between the opposites of inner and outer reality.
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Re: Section 1, "The Importance of Dreams."

Postby Hermit » Thu Feb 20, 2014 3:21 pm

John Ferric wrote:As Jung points out we are co-creators of the world. Our sensory inputs(sight, hearing, smell, touch, etc.) are, to use Jung's term "translated" from outer reality into an inner reality of the mind.
There are, moreover, unconscious aspects of our perception of reality. The first is the fact that even when our senses react to real phenomena, sights, and sounds, they are somehow translated from the realm of reality into that of the mind. Within the mind they become psychic events, whose ultimate nature is unknowable (for the psyche cannot know its own psychical substance). Thus every experience contains an indefinite number of unknown factors, not to speak of the fact that every concrete object is always unknown in certain respects, because we cannot know the ultimate nature of matter itself.
C. G. Jung, Approaching the Unconscious, Part 1, The Importance of Dreams


We are forced by our very human nature to deal with two realities. Take, for example, "unicorns." Do unicorns really exist? In one reality they do, in the other they don't. If I "Google" the term unicorn 85,400,000 results are produced. But despite that impressive number not one iota of evidence exists of the presence of unicorns in that other, the outer, reality. Unicorns are the product of the human mind only. It is the task of, not just consciousness in general, but discriminating consciousness in particular to resolve the conflict between the opposites of inner and outer reality.


Dealing with two (inner) realities is unusual. Sometimes my dreams tell me what I used to know, sometimes they hint at things that I do not understand. It is interesting on how the conscious mind can be totally uninformed about the message to which the dream is often trying to relay. I did read a comment that sometimes a dream can be a trap, as well; I'm thinking of reading about that some more. In any event, it is like living on two planes hence the correctness of the term 'unconscious.'
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